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We’re happy to let you know that we’re hosting a free webinar “Scale design efficiently with DesignOps2.0” with a guest speaker: Erica Rider from PayPal’s internal developer tools team.

Join now for free!

During the webinar, Erica will share some DesignOps best practices and explain how to smoothly transform your design processes, remove UX bottlenecks, and empower product teams with an end-to-end product development lifecycle.

Apart you’ll learn how to:

  • Transform your organization from a development-driven organization to a design-driven one.
  • Optimize your design processes and facilitate design quality through smooth processes.
  • Connect design and operations by sharing and expanding design intelligence.

Date and time: Oct 29th, 2020 at 10:00 PDT

Join here: https://get.uxpin.com/design-ops-webinar/


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Like Patrick Bateman inspecting Paul Allen’s business card, it’s easy to be envious when inspecting the design systems of GitHub, IBM, and Atlassian.

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Source: GitHub Primer

Responsive? Check.

Patterns? Check.

Vector-based design libraries? Check.

These systems are monuments to work-ethic, discipline, and teamwork. When a design system is launched, it dramatically reduces the time it takes to go from prototype to a living app. It also reduces communication friction between designers and devs and cuts UX bugs by consolidating the experience around well-supported components.

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Have you been asked to create a design system at your company? Or are you struggling to keep your existing design system components consistent between deployed code and design libraries? You owe it to yourself to see how Merge can dramatically simplify your workflow. Before I introduce Merge, let’s look at how a classical design system was built and maintained at a forwarding-looking company like GitHub. …


This is an excerpt from the Interaction Design Best Practices ebook, written by Jerry Cao, Kamil Zięba, Matt Ellis, and originally published on UXPin.com.

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Embracing Space in Interaction Design: How to Position Common Elements for Successful IxD

Effective use of space in interaction design requires an understanding of aesthetics, functionality, and human behavior. In fact, spatial design is the link between the more stylistic dimensions of language and visuals, and the more practical ones of responsiveness, time, and user behavior. Space exists somewhere in the middle, dealing with issues on both sides of the spectrum.

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Photo credits: wearec2.com

We’ll start our discussion on space by talking about it in its purest form — white space — and why you shouldn’t fear it. Then we’ll get into more practical tips on how to treat space in interaction design so that your interface doesn’t feel cluttered or isolated. …


This is an excerpt from the Interaction Design Best Practices ebook, written by Jerry Cao, Kamil Zięba, Matt Ellis, and originally published on UXPin.com.

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Size & Distance in Interaction Design: When To Apply Fitts’s Law (and When Not To)

While he never lived to see the Internet, engineering psychologist Paul Fitts nonetheless had a huge influence on digital design with his 1954 proposal now known as Fitts’s Law. We can describe Fitts’s Law as:

…a model of human movement in HCI and ergonomics which predicts that the time required to rapidly move to a target area is a function of the distance to and the size of the target.

What this means in layman’s term’s is that the larger and closer a target, the faster and easier it is to select the target. Fitts proved his idea mathematically, and the law is still popular today in digital design (just play this quick game and you’ll understand immediately). …


This is an excerpt from the Interaction Design Best Practices ebook, written by Jerry Cao, Kamil Zięba, Matt Ellis, and originally published on UXPin.com.

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Affordances — The Interaction Designer’s Secret Weapon: Different Types of Signifiers and How to Use Them

Let’s get philosophical for a second. Pretend you’ve never seen a hammer before, but now there’s one in front of you. You see a hard metal part, with weird shapes, spikes, and knobs. Then you see a long wooden part, smooth, and a little bigger than the size of your hand. Which part would you grab when you pick it up? And what is a hammer for, anyways?

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The hammer applies force to objects, but you only know that because of its signifiers. The hammer’s handle tells you that you can grab it. It’s size, shape, and look are all subtle cues to its use, and even if you don’t know what a hammer is for, you can at least guess how to pick one up. …


This is an excerpt from the Interaction Design Best Practices ebook, written by Jerry Cao, Kamil Zięba, Matt Ellis, and originally published on UXPin.com.

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Visual Direction in Interaction Design: How Appearance Affects Interaction

We don’t want to undercut the significance of words, but we don’t want to downplay visuals, either. Both are equally important elements of interaction design. Words are interactions, but the visuals (like icons, menus, graphics, etc.) are what users actually interact with.

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Photo credits: thestlbrowns.com via awwwards.com

While some usability experts might cite Craigslist or even Amazon as examples of ugly but usable (and popular) sites, there’s no doubt that aesthetics serve a function. Emotion is key to the user experience: websites with nice visuals relax users and improve credibility and usability. …


This is an excerpt from the Interaction Design Best Practices ebook, written by Jerry Cao, Kamil Zięba, Matt Ellis, and originally published on UXPin.com.

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Create Amazing User Conversations with Your Copy: Using Language to Humanize the Experience

Shakespeare and Hemingway may have manipulated words in a way that make us reflect on the human condition, but could they increase your conversion rate? The answer may surprise you.

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Photo credits: “Ernest Hemingway Writing at Campsite in Kenya.” Creative Commons

In this chapter, we’re going to discuss the best practices for writing the user interface design for your product, which covers some methods that work for all interfaces, and some that are unique to digital copy.

Clarity is Your #1 Priority

Ambiguity is the enemy of good design. This is especially true for interface copy, because the confusion will only be amplified since words are such a direct interaction. …


This is an excerpt from the Interaction Design Best Practices ebook, written by Jerry Cao, Kamil Zięba, Matt Ellis, and originally published on UXPin.com.

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The Fundamentals of Language in IxD: How Your Copy is the Foundation for Interaction Design

Communication is the basis for interaction, and we don’t need to remind you how important language is to communication. Copy may not seem like an immediate priority (especially if you have a larger team with content strategists and copywriters), but you must understand that writing is affected by (and also affects) the design. …


This is an excerpt from the Interaction Design Best Practices ebook, written by Jerry Cao, Kamil Zięba, Matt Ellis, and originally published on UXPin.com.

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The Interactive Imperative: The What & Why of Interaction Designs

Interaction is the essence of all user experiences. It is the conversation between your product and your user, and if the conversation is boring, your user will leave and talk to someone more interesting.

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Photo credits: “Interaction Design Disciplines”. Wikimedia. Creative Commons 2.0

In today’s world of infinite-scrolling websites and touch-driven mobile apps, you must understand interaction design (abbreviated as IxD) in order to create user experiences that feel fluid and lifelike. As you can see above, interaction design requires an understanding of multiple UX disciplines — which makes sense, since it’s not easy to make a system of objects and text be friendly, learnable, and useful. Interaction design is the conversation between your product and user. …


This is an excerpt from the Web UI Design for the Human Eye ebook, written by Jerry Cao, Kamil Zięba, Krzysztof Stryjewski, Matt Ellis, and originally published on UXPin.com.

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Colorful Emotions: Visual Vibrancy in Web UI Design

The skill of using colors is no less than an art form.

Across human history, master painters and other artists have earned global recognition from their ability to manipulate colors. In the modern era, the artform now opens up a lot of new commercial and business applications, first in advertising, and now in web design. With an almost bottomless depth, the skill of color usage can be improved and refined endlessly.

We’ll explore the fundamentals of color theory and color scheme, then examine the emotional effects of certain colors. …

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The design tool for teams and professionals. From UI design and prototyping to collaboration and handoff. Speed it up with UXPin. • www.uxpin.com

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